Services and Education

  • General Dentistry

  • Restorative Dentistry

  • Cosmetic Dentistry

  • Preventive Dentistry

  • Pediatric Dentistry

  • Comfort Dentistry

  • Oral Hygiene

  • Oral Health

What Is Phase I (Interceptive) And Phase II (Comprehensive) Treatment?

Phase I, or Interceptive Treatment, usually starts while the child has most of his or her baby teeth and a few of his or her permanent front incisors. This stage in development is usually between the ages of seven and nine. The goal of Phase I treatment is to intercept a moderate or severe orthodontic problem early in order to reduce or eliminate it. These problems include skeletal discrepancies, cross bites, and severe crowding.

Phase I treatment takes advantage of the early growth spurt and turns a difficult orthodontic problem into a more manageable one. This often helps reduce the need for extraction or surgery and delivers better long-term stability. Most Phase I patients require a second phase of treatment in order to achieve an ideal final bite.

Phase II treatment usually occurs a number of years later. Usually, we are waiting for the remaining permanent teeth to erupt, including second molars, before Phase II begins. This most commonly occurs at the age of 12 or 13. The goal of Phase II treatment is to achieve an ideal bite with all of the permanent teeth.

Does Everyone Need A Phase I Treatment?

Not every child needs a Phase I treatment. Only some children with certain bites require early intervention. All others can wait until most, if not all, of their permanent teeth erupt. However, it is still important that every child be evaluated by age seven.

What Is The Duration Of Orthodontic Treatment?

Most patients are in braces for 6-24 months. Treatment time depends on the development of the dentition, the severity of the problem, patient cooperation, and the degree of tooth movement required. In rare instances, usually due to a very difficult case or a non-compliant patient, the treatment may take longer than 24 months.

What Is The Difference Between Extraction And Non-Extraction Therapies?

Each treatment is a way to address crowding of the teeth. Extraction therapy is a technique where one or more permanent teeth are removed to make room for the other teeth in the mouth. This is in contrast to non-extraction therapy where one expands a patient’s jaw and/or adjusts the size and shape of some teeth to make them fit within the jaw. Our office’s treatment philosophy is very conservative, and we do make every effort to avoid extraction. However, for severe crowding and severe jaw discrepancy, the extraction approach may be required.

Is Orthodontic Care Expensive?

When orthodontic treatment is implemented at the proper time, treatment is often less costly than the dental care required to treat the more serious problems that can develop years later. Orthodontic fees have not increased as fast as many other consumer products. Financing is usually available, and many payment programs that will be offered to you will meet your needs. In addition, many insurance plans now include orthodontics.

Encourage your kids to use a mouth guard during sports, which can prevent serious dental injuries.

We at Gainesville Dental Arts in Gainesville know when to refer you to a different type of specialist, such as an orthodontist for correction of teeth irregularities or an oral surgeon for jaw realignment.

Please consult Dr. Kaur if your child has irregular teeth. Call 703-743-2324 for an appointment and visit us at Gainesville Dental Arts in Gainesville.